The HR Hitlist #2: Enabling Bad Managers

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the second in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead. 


One of my favorite movies is the classic Quentin Tarantino film, Pulp Fiction.

There’s a character in the movie who they refer to as “The Wolf.” He’s a fixer. When someone screws up or makes a serious mess, they call The Wolf. He shows up to save the day by making the problem disappear.  

I think this is how management often thinks of HR—as their own personal version of “The Wolf.” When an uncomfortable conversation is needed or they’ve made a mess with an employee, they call HR. And, since we love to feel needed in HR, we swoop in and handle things. The manager’s problem disappears. Everybody wins, right? Continue reading

The 2017 HR Hitlist #1: Saying “No”

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Neverbefore has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the first in a series of  guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead.  


If I had one wish I could use to transform the work of human resources, it would be to remove the word “no.”

This tiny word is at the core of why HR is too often viewed as an obstacle to progress rather than a facilitator of results.

  • Want to fire a problem employee? “No, you don’t have enough documentation.”
  • Want to let an employee work from home? “No, you don’t have the authority to make that decision.”  
  • Want to give your star performer a big raise? “No, that goes beyond what our policy allows.”

Managers can feel like “no” is the only thing they hear from HR.   Continue reading

Appearance and being — do recruiters represent their companies?

Social referrals, viral social media campaigns and infographic job descriptions: there are hundreds of new ideas on how to attract new talent, but how innovative are companies internally?

burgerThe war for talent calls for an attractive recruiting process and of course, recruiters are more or less forced to use modern methods to attract/source the best talents. But I wondered how wide of a gap the perception of a company could be for a potential employee as an outsider, compared to a current staff member. My hypothesis: it differs a lot.

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Growing New York tech scene and the need for talent

insights from NYTechDay and MADEINNY@APPNEXUS

New York City is an important hub for tech companies and start-ups. Recently, I visited two events that underline the strength of New York and its potential for facilitating these developments. The first one was the NYTechDay with 400+ start-ups and 10,000 attendees. This event was quite interesting and besides bigger start-ups such as Grooveshark, GeneralAssembly, Shutterstock and Uber, other less well known and coming ideas and products were shown. For example, Fitbark.com presented its wearable technology for dogs.

Jobs Map New York

At NYTechDay, most of the companies presented their products but were also looking for new talent. Which brings us to one of the bigger challenges for companies in New York City; to find new talent. A Jobs Map by “Made In NY” shows that currently over 1263 NY Tech Companies are looking for new hires. Of course this number also underlines the fast growing environment, but also shows that it is harder to find new qualified hires then for example, the San Francisco Bay area, which is also well known for its tech and start-up culture.

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