The 2017 HR Hitlist #5: Treating Technology as the Solution

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the fifth in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead.


“Golf is a hard game. I’ve had a love/hate relationship with it throughout my life.”

There have been times when I’ve wanted to be good at golf. During one of these times, I became convinced that a buying a new, state of the art set of golf clubs was the solution. If I got better clubs, surely I’d play better.

So, I saved money and ultimately made the purchase. The clubs were spendy, but they were also beautiful. It felt good to show up at the golf course with these fancy clubs. Just owning them made me feel like a more confident golfer.

But when I played with them, I still sucked.

The new clubs didn’t fix my lack of skill. They also didn’t make up for lack of practice.

Golf clubs are tools. And regardless of how fancy or expensive, they are only as good as the hands that hold them.

HR technology is just like those golf clubs.

The explosion in technology innovation means that we have a virtually endless array of technology products to buy and implement within our organization. There are technologies for every problem you can imagine in HR—from employee engagement to new hire paperwork. Continue reading

Getting the most out of 360 feedback

Guest blog post by Beth Steinberg. Beth has over 18 years of experience in organization development, talent strategy and leadership development. Her focus has been to help leaders and companies with complex organizational and growth issues. Beth focuses on driving useful employee programs, leadership coaching, executive development and organizational development.


 

Few concepts in psychology have been written about more uncritically and incorrectly than that of feedback.. . . Actually, feedback is only information, that is, data, and as such has no necessary consequences at all. – Latham & Locke

360 feedback has continued to gain popularity over the years.  Once a process used only for senior executives, new technologies, and transparent company cultures have propelled the process to include many levels of the organization.  While much of this change is positive, there are many things to think about when you embark upon a 360 feedback process for your team.

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Traditionally 360’s have been done for the following reasons:

  • To understand how the employee is viewed across an organization, including peers, key stakeholders and direct reports as part of a company feedback process.  It can also be used as “upward” feedback on a manager.
  • As an intervention designed to look at an employee’s performance when the manager has a concern that the employee is not performing well, does not align with the values and behaviors of the company, or to gather data on specific issue.  
  • To gather feedback to help the person succeed and develop in their career for development purposes.

During my career, I’ve observed many different reactions to the 360 process. Many times, I’ve seen 360’s go well, and watched the employee benefits from the process.  I’ve also seen the opposite.  Occasionally, I’ve seen total denial and a lack of trust in the feedback and the process, especially if it was used as an intervention, when the manager was looking for negative feedback.  The reaction has depended on why the 360 was being done, how it was delivered, and what happened after the feedback was given.   Continue reading

The Importance of Early Feedback for New Employees

To ensure that your processes in recruiting, onboarding and accelerating new team members into the organization is having the desired effect, it’s critical to get candid and data-driven feedback.

Giving and soliciting this type of feedback is the best way to ensure your investment in the employee experience is paying off and driving company ROI.

Recruitment and onboarding are key processes: get them right the first time and you save yourself the expense of repeating them a few months down the line. A study by the Aberdeen Group found that 86 percent of employees decide whether to stay or go within their first six months.

Read on to learn why early feedback supports new hire success and how to best implement an efficient and scalable process. Continue reading

How to give and receive peer feedback – the startup way

Ongoing communications are vital for employee engagement and productive teams. We all know that without feedback, neither our peers nor we can learn and grow. Just an annual performance review feels like scarcely scheduled feedback overload. So how and how often should feedback be best provided? How much does company culture play a role? And how can we improve on requesting and being open to constructive feedback ourselves?

In an insightful and honest hangout, the SUPPORT OPS team discusses team member reviews. Below are some learnings with regards to feedback:

Buffer is famous for their radical transparency. Revenues, salaries, purchase history, it’s all public. They are now taking this a step further. Carolyn Kopprasch, Buffer’s Chief Happiness Officer shares how they are exploring Small Improvements in their quest for ‘transparent performance feedback’.  Continue reading

Performance Pain Points – The diagnosis

11588728936_b627b5ec7a_cAlthough not recognized by any medical association, I’ll play the part of the PM-Dr… Performance Management Doctor.

A sampling of “patients” at Impact99 HR Summit 2013 Toronto described several symptoms of an ailing performance management process. There appears to be a deficiency of several important elements for a healthy process, such as results, expectations, meaning and consistency.

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Continue reading

Small Improvements in the Big Apple

Image Working remotely comes with advantages and disadvantages. For a small team of 10 people to cover 200 clients on 6 continents, being distributed in over 3 continents is awesome! The Internet makes it possible to collaborate from 5 cities but time zones and the lack of face to face connections bring challenges. Hence, Small Improvements flew the crew together and brought the development team from Berlin as well as customer success and marketing people from Sydney, San Francisco and Toronto to meet their colleague in New York. Many have worked virtually for several months, yet never got to hang out in person. Continue reading

Feedback: The guidance system for performance

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Think of performance feedback like traffic signals and signs. They are indicators that keep you moving, tell you when to stop and guide you in the right direction.

What if your performance management process was like this? Simple and easy to understand.

Most traditional performance processes are cumbersome, complicated and often do not align with organizational goals or culture. Many of us don’t see the value.

Continue reading