The 2017 HR Hitlist #5: Treating Technology as the Solution

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the fifth in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead.


“Golf is a hard game. I’ve had a love/hate relationship with it throughout my life.”

There have been times when I’ve wanted to be good at golf. During one of these times, I became convinced that a buying a new, state of the art set of golf clubs was the solution. If I got better clubs, surely I’d play better.

So, I saved money and ultimately made the purchase. The clubs were spendy, but they were also beautiful. It felt good to show up at the golf course with these fancy clubs. Just owning them made me feel like a more confident golfer.

But when I played with them, I still sucked.

The new clubs didn’t fix my lack of skill. They also didn’t make up for lack of practice.

Golf clubs are tools. And regardless of how fancy or expensive, they are only as good as the hands that hold them.

HR technology is just like those golf clubs.

The explosion in technology innovation means that we have a virtually endless array of technology products to buy and implement within our organization. There are technologies for every problem you can imagine in HR—from employee engagement to new hire paperwork. Continue reading

The 2017 HR Hitlist #4: Playing Small

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the fourth in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead.


“If there’s one thing that’s holding us back in HR more than anything else, it is our collective lack of confidence.”

Within every organization, we have departments built around technical expertise. IT are the experts in technology; finance and accounting in financial systems; and sales in sales process.  

We trust these departments to deliver solutions to business needs that exist within their areas. When the organization faces a technical challenge, we trust the IT team to assess the situation, understand the business needs, and find the right solution. Same for accounting and sales.

But, when it comes to HR, it’s a different story. Why is this?

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A new navigation is coming in Q1

In the past year we’ve improved quite a few navigational elements: User and cycle search, upcoming admin dates, global create, and general speediness. More recently we’ve shifted our attention to the sidebar, and we’re proud to enter a public beta phase now.

The new navigation has been battle-tested internally by our own staff and select alpha clients, and we’re really pleased with it. But we won’t rush it. We plan on phasing out the “old” navigation by the end of Q1, so there’s plenty of time to take a look and give us feedback!

Here’s an overview of what is new and improved:

Dedicated “your content” section

Until now the sidebar was split up strictly by module, showing submenus depending on the user’s role. An individual contributor would see their own review in the Performance Review menu, while a manager also saw their team’s reviews in an additional menu item.

We’re now dropping these role-specific menus, moving to a much cleaner and simpler layout: Independent of role every use immediately sees their own content – objectives, 360s, reviews — in one section:

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The 2017 HR Hitlist #3: Defending Broken Practices

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the third in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead.


 

When I first started railing against the performance appraisal process years ago, my colleagues in HR were the first to defend it.

“We have to do appraisals to protect ourselves legally.”

“We can’t make fair decisions about pay increases without an appraisal.”

“We have to have some record of performance.”

“You can’t assess performance without ratings.”

The ironic thing was that many of these same colleagues actually despised the very process they were defending. It was cumbersome, time consuming, and they knew the information contained in the appraisals was questionable in far too many cases.

While defending it, they had to ignore the truth that performance appraisals are often inflated by managers looking to avoid conflict. Plus, they had been telling managers that appraisals were a legal requirement for so long, they’d forgotten that it’s not actually true.

The process was broken and they knew it. But, they defended it because they felt like they had to.  

There can be no innovation or progress unless we’re open to the possibility of a better way. The black or white, yes or no, approach to HR does not work in a world of perpetual and accelerating change. As a consequence, HR is riddled with ineffective, old management practices born in an age of industrialization that have no place in today’s world of work.  

While it seems that perhaps we’ve made progress towards replacing the traditional performance appraisal process, that’s only the beginning.

How should interviewing and selection change due to the fact that people are really bad at evaluating other people? Or, what happens to compensation when we consider the evidence that financial bonuses are negatively correlated with performance for complex and creative work?   Continue reading

360 Feedback from anyone – Introducing Proactive 360 Feedback

Do you want to give people a chance to provide 360 feedback even if they were missed in the nomination phase? Or even want to leave it entirely up to people who they give feedback to, skipping the nomination & approval phases entirely?

Starting today, you can empower your team to provide feedback to any individual during a 360 Feedback Cycle with our entirely new feature: Proactive 360 Feedback.

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The HR Hitlist #2: Enabling Bad Managers

jasonheadshot-2The time is upon us for human resources to step up as a practice and lead. Never before has the work of HR been so critical to organizational success. To meet this challenge requires that we break some old habits. This is the second in a series of guest posts from thought leader, Jason Lauritsen, called the 2017 HR Hitlist. Each of the five posts will outline one practice or behavior that HR needs to eliminate, and what they should do instead. 


One of my favorite movies is the classic Quentin Tarantino film, Pulp Fiction.

There’s a character in the movie who they refer to as “The Wolf.” He’s a fixer. When someone screws up or makes a serious mess, they call The Wolf. He shows up to save the day by making the problem disappear.  

I think this is how management often thinks of HR—as their own personal version of “The Wolf.” When an uncomfortable conversation is needed or they’ve made a mess with an employee, they call HR. And, since we love to feel needed in HR, we swoop in and handle things. The manager’s problem disappears. Everybody wins, right? Continue reading

New in Small Improvements: Request feedback any time

Imagine you just finished a project, or you’ve been working with a new skill. You’re curious as to how you did and want some feedback from your peers. But how do you go about getting it?

You might email your colleagues or ask them in person – both approaches have their place, but both lack structure. On top of this, it will be difficult to refer back to your feedback at a later date.

With this in mind, we’re excited to introduce our new Request Feedback feature – a big step towards better helping your employees take ownership of their performance and make continuous improvements. This update allows every employee in your company to request feedback from whomever they want, whenever they want. Not only have we shortened the feedback cycle, but your employees can request feedback as they see fit.

Request Feedback in practice

Let’s say you just organized an event for your company, and want to get some feedback on what your peers thought of it, and how you can improve the next event.
Head over to your dashboard and click on the +Create button in the top right corner. You can read all about the functionalities of this new button on this blogpost. Select “Request Feedback” to reach the feedback form pictured below.

 

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